Evidence

The aim of this study was to elucidate terminology central to understanding the arts/health causal pathway by defining arts engagement via art forms, activities and level of engagement. Study findings provide guidance about which art forms/activities should be included in population surveys and provide a measure of arts exposure. Please contact the author for more information or the article is available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17533015.2012.656201#preview and also find out more about ESTA through Estavisa.com.au.

Our purpose is proving the arts contribute to the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities.

Evidence-based research is core to everything we do. An ability to engage on critical issues in national arts and health sectors distinguishes our work and ensures it remains balanced and effective.

We support, share and sponsor research that can prove the inherent value of the arts to health and wellbeing.

Highlighted Research

Arts, Health and Wellbeing. Personal Reflections and Political Perspectives.

Lord Howarth of Newport

This keynote address was presented by Lord Howarth of Newport, at the Culture, Health and Wellbeing International Conference  in Bristol (June 2013). This address is a comprehensive overview  of the development of the UK  arts and health sector  and its current status. More importantly it  presents an eloquent and intellectually rigorous approach to the  contemporary political tensions  that impact on our attitudes to social capital and the effects it has on healthcare delivery.

Reflecting upon the value of Arts & Health & a new approach for the East Midlands 2011-2013

This document has been produced within a wide ranging partnership. The following organisations based within the region were at the core of this partnership:

  • Big Difference Company
  • Derbyshire Community Health Services
  • Leicester City Primary Care NHS Trust
  • Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

In addition, Managers in Partnership (MiP), the national trade union for healthcare managers, has supported the project.
Much of the work within this document has centred on the geographical areas covered by those NHS organisations listed above; however contributions have come from across the East Midlands Region and beyond.

Without these contributions this document could not have been produced.

This partnership would also like to thank following individuals:

Dr. Clive Parkinson (Manchester Metropolitan University), Marisa Howes (MiP), Carole Devaney (NHS Leicester City), Jane Tuxworth (Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust), Kay Bradley (Derbyshire Community Health Services), Geoff Rowe (Big Difference Company), Anna Peavitt (Big Difference Company), Maya Biswas (Big Difference Company) Ashley Scattergood (Big Difference Company), Tim Sayers, Lydia Towsey (both Brightsparks) Alison Bowry (High Peak Community Arts), Gaynor Nash, Glenis Willmott MEP, Paddy Casswell (Glenis Willmott MEP’s Office), Jane Millum (EMPAF), Alex Gymer (Cave Consulting), Vince Atwood (Soft Touch), Christina Wigmore (Soft Touch), Jacob Wesley (Soft Touch), Theo Stickley (University of Nottingham) and many others for their professional and moral support.

Arts & Health Research Summary – Part 2

Author: prepared by Helen Zigmond for The Institute for Creative Health .

A collection of research studies on Arts and Health.

 

Arts & Health Research Summary – Part 1

Helen Zigmond

Author: prepared by Helen Zigmond for The Institute for Creative Health .

Current Arts and Health Sector overview, key organisations and websites: Annotated bibliography by Helen Zigmond.

 

Other Research Papers

Arts, Health and Wellbeing Beyond the Millennium: How far have we come and where do we want to go?

This report gives an overview of the arts and health field, with particular reference to the UK and New Zealand.

It provides a review of the evidence for the benefits of the arts to health, as well as the policy context of commissioning arts and health initiatives. It also highlights the potential role arts can play within professional education contexts (for example within medical training) as well as within therapy, healthcare and community settings.

It includes case studies and subjective reflections on how the arts can interact with health and wellbeing, and also suggests ways forward for development of the arts in support of culture, health and wellbeing.

see http://www.rsph.org.uk/en/about-us/policy-and-projects/arts-and-health/index.cfm

BrightHearts: Evaluating Interactive Art as a tool

by Dr Angie Morrow, Email: AngieM@chw.edu.au from University of Technology Sydney

Dr George Khut and Dr Angie Morrow are undertaking research to design and evaluate the efficacy of a heart-rate controlled interactive (biofeedback) artwork to assist in the management and reduction of pain and anxiety experienced by children undergoing painful, recurrent clinical procedures.

Playsongs and Lullabies: features of emotional communication

by Alison Liew Creighton. Email: ali.creighton@gmail.com from University of Western Sydney

My project aims to increase an understanding of how playsongs and lullabies facilitate emotional communication and contribute positively to the mother-infant relationship. Multiple facets will be examined including the (1) behavioural features of various dimensions or qualities of musical interaction, (2) musical features associated to various dimensions of interaction, (3) subjective/personal experience of singing songs and (4) physiological (via heart rate) features of interaction.

Interactive Music Technology for Distraction, Entertainment and Well-being for Hospitalised Young People

by Samantha Ewart from University of Western Sydney

The PhD will investigate the ways in which patients within a hospital environment can be distracted from boredom and contribute to there overall well-being during their hospital stay. This will be achieved through an interactive digital music-making device. Collaboration on system design will occur through workshops that explore individual needs for patients. We hope that the devices which we collaborate, create and modify that the patients will continue to develop and achieve positive outcomes.

Place, matter and meaning: Extending the relations

by Patricia Fenner from La Trobe University

Discourse in psychotherapeutic practice has typically focussed on technique and the therapeutic relationship. The setting in which psychological therapies occur has attracted little research attention to date. What we have understood as relationship may need to be expanded to include aspects of the material environment as constitutive in the dynamic process of psychotherapy.

The Role of Art Making in Mental Health

by Theresa Van Lith, email address: tjvanlith@students.latrobe.edu.au from La Trobe University

The aim of this report was to advance understandings of the relationship between art making and mental health recovery. A variety of research methods were used including: an in-depth review of the literature, an audit of current arts-based programs provided in the two participating psychosocial rehabilitation organisations, in-depth interviews of both staff and consumers, and development of a conceptual framework that integrated the findings from these varied methods. The study created a rich account of the different roles that art making plays in mental health recovery. In doing this, it has held to the basic principles of the recovery movement and privilege of the consumer voice.

Images of Home

by Dr Michelle Duffy, email: Michelle.Duffy@monash.edu, from Monash

This is project invited children from Officer Primary School to explore what living in Cardinia Shire\’s growth corridors means in terms ‘home’ in a rapidly changing environment. After recording everyday sounds,the children talked to us about what made these sounds meaningful to them, then worked with the sound designer to create a sound art piece. Recordings were made in and around Officer Primary School, including the Rythdale Officer Cardinia Football Club, and Officer Primary school grounds.

Art Research in Catholic Healthcare

by Associate Professor Lindsay Farrell, lindsay.farrell@acu.edu.au from Australian Catholic University (Brisbane Campus)

The aim of the Art Research in Catholic Healthcare (ARCH) project is to formally evaluate the impact of art within the Catholic healthcare setting on spiritual wellbeing, including sense of meaning and purpose. It will use surveys and stakeholder discussions to measure the effect of art in Catholic healthcare. This study is underway to investigate the way people in Catholic Healthcare settings respond to the art they see around them. The term ‘art’ is considered to include paintings, sculptures and other decorations within the healthcare facility.

Growing up with cancer

by Associate Professor Ian Kerridge. Email: GUWC.research@usyd.edu.au from University of Sydney and University of Newcastle, Australia

Our research involved 20 cancer survivors (aged 15-30 years) participating in research and creative activities. Working with a visual artist (Kris Smith), they created self-portraits; mixed media, graphic, photographic, and musical representations of themselves and their cancer journey. Interviews with a researcher provided material for the generation of self-portraits, while exploratory work during the creative process generated reflections for subsequent interviews.

Aesthetics for Visual Arts in Hospitals

by Dr Jillian Gates from University of Sydney

This thesis is the outcome of this original inquiry and examines the questions, how canvisual arts be received in hospitals? and how does western society represent illness and death? These questions explores how patients, their family members, and carers respond to art in hospitals, while acknowledging their discomfort experienced in hospital settings. This inquiry took the form of a comparative case study between Balmain and Wyong Hospitals, NSW, Australia. The aim of the study was to produce a reflective and empathetic response to elderly patients in waiting rooms as a mode to investigate the potential of evidence based art for hospitals. The intention was to produce a series of digital photographs that reflected the art pref erence of elderly patients. The out comes of the study uncovered the patients waiting experience and recorded their levels of discomfort. It established the potential and significance of landscape photography in hospital waiting rooms to create a less threatening environment. The participants selected landscapes as their preferred subject matter for visual arts in hospitals. The study contributes to Australian arts health research by comparing Australian arts health projects to international examples. These comparisons indicate that further research is required to comprehensively understand the hospital waiting experience of Australian patients, and their family members in order to create visual arts that they can appreciate and respond to.

Effectiveness of Participative Community Singing Intervention Program on Promoting Resilience and Mental Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Australia

by Dr. Jing Sun

Citation for the article: Sun, J. & Buys, N. (2012). Effectiveness of participative community singing intervention program on promoting resilience and mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Essential Notes in Psychiatry, Dr. Victor Olisah (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0574-9, InTech, Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/essential-notes-in-psychiatry/Effectiveness of participative community singing intervention program on promoting resilience and me.

Defining arts engagement for population-based health research: Art forms, activities and level of engagement

by Christina Davies (nee Mills) christina.davies@westnet.com.au from The University of Western Australia

The aim of this study was to elucidate terminology central to understanding the arts/health causal pathway by defining arts engagement via art forms, activities and level of engagement. Study findings provide guidance about which art forms/activities should be included in population surveys and provide a measure of arts exposure. Please contact the author for more information or the article is available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17533015.2012.656201#preview

The effectiveness of youth audience participation at dance performances to promote the Be Active physical activity message

by Christina Davies (nee Mills) christina.davies@westnet.com.au from The University of Western Australia

The aim of this study was to evaluate the cognitive impact (awareness, comprehension, acceptance, intention & action) of the Be Active message at sponsored dance performances participated in by young people as part of an audience. Findings suggest that performing arts events can be utilised as a setting to promote physical activity to young people. Please contact the author for more information or the article is available at: http://www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/unesco/ejournal/vol-two-issue-two.html

Are the arts an effective setting for promoting health messages?

by Christina Davies (nee Mills) christina.davies@westnet.com.au from The University of Western Australia

The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of Healthway arts sponsorship program to promote health messages (physical activity, sun protection, nutrition, alcohol & smoking). Findings suggest the arts have merit beyond intrinsic artistic value and are a viable setting for promoting health to the general population. Please contact the principal researcher for more information or the article is available at: http://rsh.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/10/05/1757913911419895.abstract?rss=1

Evidence Brief- Arts and Health

Health Policy Research Institute

The overall finding of the review is that utilising the arts in health settings can lead to greater effectiveness and efficiency in healthcare delivery.
Evidence also suggests the potential for overall cost savings through better management of symptoms and reduced use of health services.

Arts and Health – A Guide to the Evidence

by Dr Christine Putland from Independent Consultant – Arts and Health

AHF commissioned this paper to support the work of the Ministerial Working Group to develop a national arts and health framework. Arts and Health is an emerging field encompassing a broad and diverse range of practice. Evidence for the connections between the arts and health and wellbeing is growing. Existing evidence focuses on select areas of practice rather than giving an overview. Dr Putland’s report draws on such reviews, offering a quick guide to current evidence across the entire field.